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 Peasant Bread

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Astraea

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Age : 56
Location : Arizona, USA
Favorite Quote : Beware the deadly donkey falling from the sky You may choose the way you live, my friend But not the way you die
Registration date : 2007-08-11

PostSubject: Peasant Bread   Tue Dec 04, 2012 9:29 am

http://www.alexandracooks.com/2012/11/07/my-mothers-peasant-bread-the-best-easiest-bread-you-will-ever-make/

My Motherís Peasant Bread
Original Source: The Palo Alto Junior League Cookbook

Note: This is a very wet, no-knead dough, so, while the original recipe doesnít call for one, some sort of baking vessel, such as pyrex bowls (about 1-L or 1.5 L) or ramekins for mini loaves is required to bake this bread.

4 cups (1 lb. 2 oz) all-purpose flour*
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 cups lukewarm water**
1 tablespoon sugar
2 teaspoons active-dry yeast***

room temperature butter, about 2 tablespoons

* My mother always uses 1 cup graham flour and 3 cups all-purpose or bread flour. Also, you can use as many as 3 cups of whole wheat flour, but the texture changes considerably. I suggest trying with all all-purpose or bread flour to start and once you get the hang of it, start trying various combinations of whole wheat flour and/or other flours. Also, measure scant cups of flour if you are not measuring by weight: scoop flour into the measuring cup using a separate spoon or measuring cup; level off with a knife. The flour should be below the rim of the measuring cup.

** To make fool-proof lukewarm water that will not kill the yeast (water thatís too hot can kill yeast), boil some water ó I use my teapot. Then, mix 1 1/2 cups cold water with 1/2 cup boiling water. This ratio of hot to cold water will be the perfect temperature for the yeast.

***I buy Red Star yeast in bulk (2lbs.) from Amazon. I store it in my freezer, and it lasts forever. If you are using the packets of yeast (the kind that come in the 3-fold packets), just go ahead and use a whole packet ó I think itís 2.25 teaspoons. I have made the bread with active dry and rapid rise and instant yeast, and all varieties work. If you are interested in buying yeast in bulk, here you go: Red Star Baking Yeast

1. In a large mixing bowl whisk the flour and the salt. Set aside. Grease a separate large bowl with butter or olive oil and set this aside. (This is optional actually ó I now just let the bread rise in the same bowl that I mix it in. My mother, however, always transfers the dough to a greased bowl.)

2. In a small mixing bowl, dissolve the sugar into the water. Sprinkle the yeast over top. There is no reason to stir it up. Let it stand for about 10 to 15 minutes or until the mixture is foamy and/or bubbling just a bit ó this step is just to ensure that the yeast is active. (See photo above.) Now, gently stir it up, and add to the flour bowl. Stir this mixture up with a spatula or wooden spoon. Mixture will be very wet. Scrape this mixture into prepared greased bowl from step 1. (Or, if youíre feeling lazy, just cover this bowl with plastic wrap or a tea towel.)

3. Cover bowl with a tea towel or plastic wrap and set aside in a warm spot to rise for at least an hour. This is what my mother always does: Preheats the oven at its highest temperature for just one minute, then shuts off the oven. Next, she runs a tea towel under hot water and rings it out so itís just damp. Finally, she covers the bowl containing the bread with the damp tea towel and places it in the warm, turned-off oven to rise. It usually takes about an hour to double in bulk, but letting it rise for an hour and a half or up to two hours is fine.

4. Preheat the oven to 425ļF. Grease two oven-safe bowls (such as the pyrex bowls I mentioned above) with about a tablespoon of butter each. (My mother might use even more ó more butter not only adds flavor but also prevents sticking). Using two forks, punch down your dough, scraping it from the sides of the bowl, which it will be clinging to. As you scrape it down try to turn the dough up onto itself if that makes sense. You want to loosen the dough entirely from the sides of the bowl, and you want to make sure youíve punched it down. Take your two forks and divide the dough into two equal portions ó eye the center of the mass of dough, and starting from the center and working out, pull the dough apart with the two forks. Then scoop up each half and place into your prepared bowls. This part can be a little messy ó the dough is very wet and will slip all over the place. Using small forks or forks with short tines makes this easier ó my small salad forks work best; my dinner forks make it harder. Itís best to scoop it up fast and plop it in the bowl in one fell swoop. Let the dough rise for about 30 minutes or until it has risen to just below or above (depending on what size bowl you are using) the top of the bowls.

5. Bake for 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to 375ļ and make for 22 to 25 minutes longer. Remove from the oven and turn the loaves onto cooling racks. If youíve greased the bowls well, the loaves should fall right out onto the cooling racks. If the loaves look a little pale and soft when youíve turned them out onto your cooling racks, place the loaves into the oven (outside of their bowls) and let them bake for about 5 minutes longer. Remove from oven and let cool for 10 minutes before cutting.
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