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 Meadowsweet

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Astraea

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PostSubject: Meadowsweet   Thu Mar 17, 2011 6:34 pm

http://www.drugs.com/npp/meadowsweet.html

Meadowsweet Uses and Pharmacology
Colds

Meadowsweet is used for supportive therapy in colds, probably because of its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic actions. 5 , 6 , 8 , 10 The roots have been used to treat respiratory problems such as hoarseness, cough, and wheezing. 3
Ulcers

The plant is also used as a digestive remedy for acid indigestion or peptic ulcers. It protects the inner lining of the stomach while providing the anti-inflammatory benefits of salicylates. 7 A reduction in ulcerogenic action has been documented in rats, promoting the healing of induced chronic ulcers and preventing acetylsalicylic acid-induced lesions in the stomach. 19 However, meadowsweet has been reported to potentiate ulcerogenic properties in animals. 2
Joint problems

Because joint problems may be related to increased acid, the ability of meadowsweet to reduce acidity is beneficial in treating joint problems. 7 Meadowsweet may also improve the condition of connective joint tissue. 10 In folk medicine, meadowsweet was used as a treatment for rheumatism of muscles and joints, and for arthritis. 6
Anticoagulant

A heparin-plant protein complex was found to have anticoagulant and fibrinolytic properties. 17 Meadowsweet flowers and seeds demonstrated an increased level of anticoagulant activity in vitro and in vivo in another report. 20 In vitro complement inhibition from the plant's flowers has been studied. 21
Bacteriostatic

Bacteriostatic activity from meadowsweet flower extracts include actions against Staphylococcus aureus , Staphylococcus epidermidis , Escherichia coli , Proteus vulgaris , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa . 2 The salicylic acid in the plant is a known disinfectant used to treat ailments such as skin diseases. 3 Meadowsweet is also a urinary antiseptic, the mechanism of action being its close relation to phenol. 10
Astringent

The tannins in the plant possess astringent properties. Root preparations have been used in the treatment of diarrhea. 2 , 3
Cancer

Local administration of a meadowsweet decoction resulted in a 39% decrease in the frequency of induced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix and vagina in mice; 67% of patients had a positive response. 22
Relaxant

Meadowsweet has been used as a sedative and to soothe nerves. 3 Reduction of motor activity and potentiation of narcotic action has been observed in animals given the herb. 2
Miscellaneous

Meadowsweet had no effect on glycemic control when studied in mice for treatment of diabetes. 23
Dosage

Doses of 2.5 to 3.5 g/day of flower and 4 to 5 g of herb are considered conventional; however, no clinical trials support the safety or efficacy of these dosages. 1
Pregnancy/Lactation

Documented adverse effects. 4 Uteroactivity from meadowsweet has been observed in vitro; avoid administration during pregnancy and lactation. 2
Interactions

None well documented.
Adverse Reactions

The Complete German Commission E Monographs lists no known side effects. 5

The Complete German Commission E Monographs lists no known contraindications (except in those with salicylate sensitivity), or drug interactions with use of meadowsweet. 5 The FDA has classified the plant as an “herb of undefined safety.” 3

Use caution because of the toxicity profile of salicylates. Methyl salicylate can be absorbed through the skin, resulting in fatalities, especially in children. 2 , 3

Bronchospasm has been documented with use of the plant; therefore, use caution in patients with asthma.
Bibliography
1. Blumenthal M, Brinckmann J, Goldberg A, eds. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs . Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications; 2000: 253-256.
2. Newall C, et al. Herbal Medicines . London, England: Pharmaceutical Press; 1996:191-192.
3. Duke J. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs . Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press Inc.; 1989:196-197.
4. Newall CA, Anderson LA, Phillipson JD, eds. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health-Care Professionals . London, England: Pharmaceutical Press; 1996.
5. Blumenthal M, ed. The Complete German Commission E Monographs . Boston, MA: American Botanical Council; 1998:169.
6. Bisset N. Herbal Drugs and Phytopharmaceuticals . Stuttgart, Germany: CRC Press; 1994:480-482.
7. Chevallier A. Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants . New York, NY: DK Publishing; 1996:96.
8. Schulz V, Hansel R, Tyler VE. Rational Phytotherapy . Berlin Heidelberg, Germany: Springer-Verlag; 1998:143-144.
9. Bruneton J. Pharmacognosy, Phytochemistry, Medicinal Plants . Paris, France: Lavoisier; 1995:221-222, 316-318.
10. Zeylstra H. Filipendula ulmaria . Br J Phytother . 1998;5:8-12.
11. Poukens-Renwart P, Tits M, Wauters JN, Angenot L. Densitometric evaluation of spiraeoside after derivatization in flowers of Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim. J Pharm Biomed Anal . 1992;10:1085-1088.
12. Thieme H. Isolation of a new phenolic glycoside from the blossoms of Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim [in German]. Pharmazie . 1966;21:123.
13. Lamaison J, et al. Principal flavonoids of aerial parts of Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim. subsp. ulmaria and subsp. denudata . Pharm Acta Helv . 1992;67:218-222.
14. Lamaison JL, Carnat A, Petitjean-Freytet C. Tannin content and inhibiting activity of elastase in Rosaceae [in French]. Ann Pharm Fr . 1990;48:335-340.
15. Meier B, et al. Salicylates in plant drugs: screening methods (HPLC, TLC) for their detection. Deutsche Apotheker Zeitung . 1987;127:2401-2407.
16. Kudriashov BA, Liapina LA, Azieva LD. The content of a heparin-like anticoagulant in the flowers of the meadowsweet [in Russian]. Farmakol Toksikol . 1990;53:39-41.
17. Kudriashov BA, Ammosova IM, Liapina LA, et al. Heparin from the meadowsweet ( Filipendula ulmaria ) and its properties [in Russian]. Izv Akad Nauk SSSR Biol . 1991;6:939-943.
18. Henih HI, Ladna LI. Phytochemical study of the dropworts, Filipendula ulmaria and F. hexapetala , from the flora of Lvov Province [in Ukrainian]. Farm Zh . 1980:(1):50-52.
19. Barnaulov OD, Denisenko PP. Anti-ulcer action of a decoction of the flowers of the dropwort, Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim [in Russian]. Farmakol Toksikol . 1980;43:700-705.
20. Liapina LA, Koval'chuk GA. A comparative study of the action on the hemostatic system of extracts from the flowers and seeds of the meadowsweet ( Filipendula ulmaria [L.] Maxim.) [in Russian]. Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol . 1993;4:625-628.
21. Halkes S, et al. Strong complement inhibitor from the flowers of Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim. Pharm Pharmacol Lett . 1997;7:79-82.
22. Peresun'ko AP, Bespalov VG, Limarenko AI, Aleksandrov VA. Clinico-experimental study of using plant preparations from the flowers of Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim for the treatment of precancerous changes and prevention of uterine cervical cancer [in Russian]. Vopr Onkol . 1993;39:291-295.
23. Swanson-Flatt SK, Day C, Bailey CJ, Flatt PR. Evaluation of traditional plant treatments for diabetes: studies in streptozotocin diabetic mice. Acta Diabetol Lat . 1989;26:51-55.

Copyright © 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health
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PostSubject: Applications for Meadowsweet   Thu Mar 17, 2011 6:36 pm

APPLICATIONS

Meadowsweet may be used in various ways to cure various disorders. It may be ingested in the infusion and tincture forms and applied externally as compress. The herb is also useful as eyewash.

Aerial parts:
INFUSION: Infusion prepared from meadowsweet is useful in healing colds associated with fever as well as rheumatic pains. The infusion from this herb also relieves stomach upsets in children.
TINCTURE: Tincture prepared from meadowsweet is normally more potent than the infusion and acts more effectively. It may be ingested to treat disorders like gastric ulcers or intense acidity. You may also prepare a tincture of meadowsweet blended with other herbs like angelica and/ or willow to treat arthritis.
COMPRESS: Meadowsweet may be applied externally as a compress to get relief from arthritis and rheumatic or painful joints. The compress may also be applied to treat neuralgia (an irregular and often cruel pain in a part of the body along the path of a nerve, especially when there is no physical change in the nerve itself). Prepare the compress by saturating a pad in the diluted tincture and apply the pad on the aching parts.
EYEWASH: Meadowsweet is very useful in treating conjunctivitis. In fact, when applied as eyewash it brings relief to patients suffering from conjunctivitis and other eye problems. The eyewash may be prepared by cooling and filtering the infusion prepared from the herb.

GOOD BLOOD WINE

* 1 cup (50 g) meadowsweet flowers
* 1 cup (25 g) sage
* 1 cup (25 g) parsley
* 1/2 cup (100 g) creamy, unpasteurized honey
* 4 cups (1 liter) tannic red wine

Chop the plants in a blender. Combine with the red wine and macerate and let stand for 1 month. Stir from time to time. Strain using cheesecloth and stir in the honey; dissolve well. Drink 1 oz (25 ml) before the two main meals to enrich the blood, reinforce the heart and combat postmenstrual anemia.
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PostSubject: Re: Meadowsweet   Thu Mar 17, 2011 6:38 pm

COMMON NAMES

* Bridewort
* Meadowsweet
* Queen Of The Meadow

The therapeutic values of meadowsweet are very much like those of aspirin. However, unlike aspirin, meadowsweet is safe and does not have any adverse side affects. Hence, it is not surprising that meadowsweet is known to be among the best antacid medications available. The herb is effective in curing indigestion owing to excessive production of acids in the stomach, heartburn, gastritis, peptic ulcers and hiatus hernia. In addition, meadowsweet helps in relieving intestinal wind and distension and according to experts, it should be given priority over other medications while treating inflammatory conditions in the stomach or in the bowels. Tannins (a brownish or yellowish compound found in plants that is used for tanning, dyes and astringents) present in meadowsweet function like astringents (substances that draws tissue together) in the bowel. They safeguard as well as cure the mucous membranes (thin flexible sheets of tissue connecting, covering, lining or separating various parts or organs in animal and plant bodies) alleviating problems like enteritis and diarrhea. Their gentle antiseptic or anti-bacterial functions helps in countering infections, while the tannins’ properties to relax or make the muscles less tense helps in relieving stomach pains and colic disorders.

As mentioned earlier, the therapeutic qualities of the meadowsweet herb are much like that of aspirin, unlike aspirin, the herb is not associated with any side affects. The superfluous tannins and mucilage present in the herb safeguards the lining of the digestive system and this property of meadowsweet makes it a valuable medication for curing gastritis as well as gastric ulcers or sores.

Meadowsweet possesses anti-inflammatory properties or actions that counter rabble-rousing. This action of the herb is useful for treating aches, pains, rheumatism (pain of the joints), arthritis as well as gout. The herb helps in alleviating inflamed joints and its diuretic properties enhances the urine outflow thereby helping in throwing out toxic (noxious) wastes as well as uric acid from the body. The analgesic consequence of meadowsweet aids in relieving pain and also alleviating headaches and neuralgia. In addition, the capability of meadowsweet to relax the muscles let loose muscle contraction and encourages sleep, getting rid of insomnia. The diaphoretic or sweat inducting function of the herb is helpful in diminishing high temperatures and eruptive infections or contagions like measles and chicken pox.

Meadowsweet is held in high esteem by scientists, herbal practitioners as well as the common masses for its decontamination diuretic consequences which are also known to have cleared the skin as well as get rid of rashes. The gentle antiseptic or sterilizing action of meadowsweet makes it a useful medication for treating disorders like cystitis and urethritis (inflammation of the urethra), fluid retention or preservation as well as kidney problems. Salicylate salts present in the herb are reported to make softer the different deposits in the body. For instance, the salicylate salts are helpful in mitigating the kidney stones and gravel and also atherosclerosis (a common arterial disease in which raised areas of deterioration and cholesterol deposits plaques form on the inner surfaces of the arteries obstructing blood flow).
PARTS USED

Aerial parts, flowers.
USES

The Druids (a priest of an ancient Celtic religion practiced in Britain, Ireland and Gaul until the people of those areas were converted to Christianity) considered meadowsweet to be one of their most blessed aromatic plant. Despite the Druids’ opinion regarding the plant, it is still unheard of whether they used the herb as a medicine. Nevertheless, meadowsweet has been an ancient folk medication in most regions of Europe. Referring to meadowsweet, in 1652, naturalist Nicholas Culpepper had written in his much-valued medical text that “it helps in the speedy recovery from cholic (bile acid) disorders and removes the instability and constant change in the stomach’.

Several researches on meadowsweet have displayed that the herb is an effective medication for curing acid indigestion. Although the herb’s power to diminish acid levels right through the body is yet to be proved, meadowsweet’s efficiency in relieving excruciating pains owing to arthritis and rheumatic disorders is in all probability not only owing to its anti-inflammatory functions or properties. Nevertheless, it has been found that diminishing the excessive acidity in the stomach often helps in lessening the acid levels in the entire body. This in turn, helps in alleviating joint problems that are reportedly related to acidity. It may be mentioned here that meadowsweet is also used to treat problems like cystitis (inflammation of the urinary bladder, often caused by infection).

It may be underlined here that meadowsweet is a safe medication for diarrhea, even for children. In addition meadowsweet is blended with other herbs to cure irritable bowel syndrome.
HABITAT AND CULTIVATION

Although meadowsweet is indigenous to Europe, it thrives without any effort in moist places. The herb basically prefers damp places like ditches as well as stream and river banks. Normally, the meadowsweet saplings grow on their own from the seeds. However, the herb can also be disseminated through root division. The best time of the year to propagate the herb through root division is autumn or spring. The leaves of the herb and the flower clippings are collected during summer when the flowers are open.
RESEARCH

Researches on meadowsweet has shown that the salicylates (salts or esters of salicylic acid) present in the plant are substances similar to aspirin and they help in diminishing irritation and swelling (inflammation) as well as relieving pains. They are especially effective in arthritis problems. However, dissimilar to aspirin that gives rise to gastric ulcers when taken in high doses, a blend of salicylates, tannins (a brownish or yellowish compound found in plants that is used in tanning, dyes and astringents) and other ingredients found in meadowsweet function to safeguard the inside layer of the stomach and intestines. At the same time, the blend provides anti-inflammatory advantages owing to the presence of the salicylates. It may be mentioned here that meadowsweet is an ideal example that shows that it is not possible to appreciate or comprehend herbal medicines just by judging their active ingredients separately.
CONSTITUENTS

* Flavonol glycosides (approximately 1 %), mainly glycosides of quercetin
* Phenolic glycosides (salicylates)
* Volatile oil (salicylaldehyde)
* Polyphenols (tannins)

USUAL DOSAGE

Meadowsweet may be ingested both as an infusion as well as tincture. When consuming meadowsweet in infusion, you may ingest 200 ml or 8 fluid ounces of it thrice daily to treat digestive problems. However, to treat diarrhea in adults use double-strength (i.e. 400 ml or 16 fluid ounces) infusion three times daily. Two ml or 40 drops of the tincture prepared from meadowsweet may be taken thrice daily to treat arthritis problems.
HOW IT WORKS IN THE BODY

Researches have established that the salicylic (a white crystalline acid) factor in the herb is basically conscientious for the plants’ anti-inflammatory and pain relieving properties. Thus, when herbs comprising salicylic are used in treating musculoskeletal problems like arthritis, they are very effectual. Significantly, the same ingredient is again used to treat abnormal acidity like gastric ulcers. It is very effective in the treatment of ingestion disorders like stomach ulcers and irritable bowel symptoms that are generally caused owing to excessive production of acids in the digestive system. Incidentally, salicylic component is not only important in diminishing acidity, but it also functions vigorously in curing the alimentary canal wherever there is inflammation. For years, salicylic component has been used by physicians as a mild medication to cure diarrhea and has been especially praised for its effectiveness in curing diarrhea among children. The later aspect of the ingredient has even been approved by the present day herbal medicine practitioners.
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PostSubject: Re: Meadowsweet   Thu Mar 17, 2011 6:58 pm


• Hardy to Zone 2

Meadowsweet is an appealing herb in many ways: In the garden, it gives off a pleasant wintergreen and sweet almond fragrance, and its wrinkled, dark-green leaves with 3-foot reddish stalks delight the senses. But the herb is probably best known for its chemical components, which have made it popular throughout history as a remedy for aches and fever.

Meadowsweet was the key headache-busting ingredient from which aspirin was synthesized; Bayer Pharma-ceuticals used dried meadowsweet leaves for its original methyl salicylic acid formulation. In Colonial times, meadowsweet was used as an anti-inflammatory to reduce the symptoms of arthritis and rheumatism. And, because the herb is gentle on the stomach, it also was used to treat stomach upsets, feverish colds, diarrhea and heartburn. Meadowsweet belongs to the rose family (Rosaceae), and was Queen Elizabeth I’s favorite strewing herb. The 16th-century herbalist Gerard believed it outranked all other strewing herbs because its aromatic leaves didn’t cause headaches, unlike many other strongly scented leaves. Meadowsweet’s popularity as a strewing herb at weddings earned it its alternate name, bridewort.

And throughout history, meadowsweet has maintained its usefulness in the home. Housewives used the plant in their cleaning routine, drying clusters of tiny white florets and placing them on the floor and in cabinets to mask unpleasant odors. Cooks used the herb to flavor beers, meads and wines and added it to soups for an interesting almond flavor. As a cosmetic, it was soaked in rainwater and used as astringent and skin conditioner.

This European native perennial grows in many parts of the world, including North America, where it is appreciated more for its medicinal uses than as a garden plant.

Plants grown in organically enriched, well-watered soil will produce a healthy rhizome. Meadowsweet is a good candidate to grow in moist meadows or near bodies of water, where the herb blooms from June through August. And while the versatile herb can grow in full or partial sun, in boggy soil where summers are cool, or in latitudes where summers are warm to hot, meadowsweet does require some attention. It reacts well to heavy compost at least once each season. And if leaves become tattered in the summer, severely prune them and keep soil moist until new leaves emerge.

Use fresh leaves to flavor sorbets and fruit salads. You can infuse the flower to make a mild diuretic tea. Meadowsweet has a sharp flavor, somewhat like burnet, so you can drop a leaf into a cup of claret wine and enjoy the bite it offers. When making tea, cover the brew and let it steep to bring out the salicylic acid before serving to guests. No one will leave with a headache

Read more: http://www.herbcompanion.com/UnCategorized/HERBS-TO-KNOW-Sweets-in-the-Garden-Three-Historic-Herbs.aspx
Quote :
Please read WebMD.com before using meadowsweet. It is similar to aspirin and can interact badly with aspirin products, can cause lung spasms which will aggrevate asthma, and should NOT be used by pregnant women because it may cause miscarriage.

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PostSubject: Uses of Meadowsweet   Thu Mar 17, 2011 7:03 pm

http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/edible-flower-entry.php?term=Meadowsweet

Meadowsweet, Filipendula ulmaria, (also known as Queen of the Meadow, Pride of the Meadow and Brierwort) is a perennial herb of the Rosaceae (rose) family that grows in damp meadows. It was originally spelled medesweete, a name associated with the way the plant's flowers were used as a sweet flavouring for mead.

The stems are 1–2 m tall, erect and furrowed, reddish to sometimes purple. The leaves are dark green on the upper side and whitish and downy underneath, much divided, interruptedly pinnate, having a few large serrate leaflets and small intermediate ones. Terminal leaflets are large, 4-8 cm long and three to five-lobed. Meadowsweet has delicate, graceful, creamy-white flowers clustered close together in handsome irregularly-branched cymes, having a very strong, sweet smell. They flower from June to early September.

The whole herb possesses a pleasant taste and flavour, the green parts having a similar aromatic character to the flowers, leading to the use of the plant to strew on floors to give the rooms a pleasant aroma, and its use to flavour wine and beer. In the past the root was dried, ground and used as a substitute for flour. The plant can also be roast as a vegetable.
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PostSubject: MeadowSweet Video   Thu Mar 17, 2011 7:21 pm

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PostSubject: Meadowsweet Mead   Thu Mar 17, 2011 7:26 pm

Meadowsweet Mead

Origin: British Period: Modern
Ingredients:
5l of unchlorinated water
2.5 kg wildflower honey (a heather honey would be excellent, but any wildflower honey will suffice)
2 lemons, sliced
80g dried meadowsweet leaves
1 egg white Yeast (Epernay II is good but champagne yeast would also work)

Method: Preparation As with most of the other recipes here, this has been gauged to make 5l of mead. Only a basic listing of ingredients is given, and for a brewing method please see this page for a step-by-step guide. Also see this page for a list of the equipment you'll need. Follow the instructions given in the basic extract brewing page to make your mead but add the egg-white to the water at the same time as the honey. The egg-white will help remove the scum (which you need to skim off). When no more scum appears add the meadowsweet leaves, turn off the heat, cover with a lid and allow to cool over night. In the morning, crush the raisins and then strain them out. Now add the yeast and prepare the must as usual. This is not a 'short' mead, and the first racking should be done after about a month and the second after fermentation stops completely. When you can read newsprint through the jug of mead, bottle and cork. This is a wine-like mead, and once bottled leave to mature for at least a year.

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/brewing/fetch-recipe.php?rid=meadowsweet-mead
Copyright © celtnet
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PostSubject: Winter Herb Punch   Thu Mar 17, 2011 7:30 pm

How to Make: Winter Herb Punch
Ingredients
1l White Grape Juice
250ml Earl Grey Tea
60ml Runny Honey
200g Sugar
2 Bay Leaves
1/2 tsp Whole Cloves
1/2 tsp Fennel Seeds
1 tsp Elderflowers
1 tsp Meadowsweet flowers
2 Cinnamon Sticks (Broken)
4 Allspice Berries Zest
and juice of 1/2 Lemon Zest
and juice of 1/2 Orange

Method Add all the ingredients to a pan and warm through. Take off the heat and allow to infuse until cold. Strain in a jar, place in the fridge to chill and serve over crushed ice.

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/miscellaneous/fetch-recipe.php?rid=misc-winter-berb-punch
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PostSubject: MidSummer Mead   Fri Mar 18, 2011 4:43 am

Midsummer Mead

Origin: British Period: Modern

Ingredients:
5l of unchlorinated water
500ml honey
500ml meadowsweet leaves (packed)
90g brown sugar
500ml woodruff sprigs (packed)
500g barley malt
500ml heather flowers, packed
3 cloves Yeast (Epernay II is good but champagne yeast would also work)

Method: Preparation As with most of the other recipes here, this has been gauged to make 5l of mead. Only a basic listing of ingredients is given, and for a brewing method please see this page for a step-by-step guide. Also see this page for a list of the equipment you'll need. Follow the instructions given in the basic extract brewing page to make your mead. Begin by pouring the water into a large pan. Bring to a boil then add the meadowsweet herb, woodruff sprigs, heather flowers, and cloves. Boil for one hour and then add the honey, brown sugar, and barley malt. Stir until everything has dissolved then cover with a lid and allow to cool over night. In the morning, strain through a cheesecloth then add the yeast and prepare the must as usual. This is not a 'short' mead, and the first racking should be done after about a month and the second after fermentation stops completely. When you can read newsprint through the jug of mead, bottle and cork. This is a wine-like mead, and once bottled leave to mature for at least a year.

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/brewing/fetch-recipe.php?rid=midsummer-mead
Copyright © celtnet
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PostSubject: Rice Pudding with Meadowsweet and Compote of Wild Cherries    Fri Mar 18, 2011 4:57 am

How to Make: Rice Pudding with Meadowsweet and Compote of Wild Cherries
Ingredients

For the compote of cherries:
juice of 1 lemon
grated zest of 1 orange
500ml red wine
1 meadowsweet head
3 cherry kernels, crushed
100g caster sugar
300g cherries, stoned
100g wild cherries, stoned

For the rice pudding:
75g risotto rice
350ml milk
150ml double cream
3 meadowsweet heads pared
zest of 1/2 orange, in wide strips
50g caster sugar, plus extra for glazing
freshly-grated nutmeg
1 1/2 gelatine laves
1 teaspoon Grand Marnier

For the pastry cream:
100ml milk
75ml double cream
40g caster sugar
1 egg yolk
5g corn flour

Method

The night before prepare the cherry compote. Add all the ingredients (except the cherries) to a pan, bring to a boil and allow to simmer for 4 minutes then add the cherries and cook for 5 minutes. Remove the cherries with a slotted spoon and set aside. Bring the cooking juices to a boil and reduce the volume by half. Strain the resultant juice onto the cherries and leave to macerate over night.

The following day place the rice, milk, half the double cream, orange zest, caster sugar meadowsweet heads and nutmeg to a saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Reduce to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes, or until the rice is soft and the mixture has turned thick and creamy. Take the rice off the heat.

Meanwhile, immerse the gelatine in cold water for 5 minutes. Squeeze out the excess water and add the gelatine to the hot rice, stirring constantly until it's dissolved. Remove the meadowsweet heads and allow to cool.

While the rice pudding is cooking add the milk and cream to a pan and bring to a boil. Place the sugar, egg yolk and cornflour to a bowl and whisk until combined. Pour the milk and cream mixture into this and whisk continually until combined. Pour the resultant mixture into a saucepan and cook over low heat until the mixture thickens. Take off the heat and allow to cool.

When the rice pudding and the pastry cream have cooled mix them together then place in the fridge for about 90 minutes, or until nearly set. Meanwhile whip the remaining cream with the Grand Marnier until it forms thick ribbons. Just before the rice pudding sets fold the whipped cream into the rice pudding and transfer to 6 well-oiled metal ring moulds (about 6cm in diameter and 4cm deep). Cover and chill for 4 hours before turning the puddings out onto serving plates and dusting with icing sugar.

Drizzle the cherry compote over the top and around the sides then serve.

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/miscellaneous/fetch-recipe.php?rid=misc-rice-pudding-meadowsweet-wild-cherries
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PostSubject: Meadowsweet Cordial    Fri Mar 18, 2011 5:05 am

How to Make: Meadowsweet Cordial
Ingredients

50 meadowsweet blossoms
2 ltr water
250 g sugar
2 lemons

Method

Pour the water into a large saucepan and add meadowsweet flowers. Bring to the boil, then add the sugar and stir until the sugar has completely dissolved. Turn off the heat, add the juice of one lemon and leave aside to let the flavours infuse (preferably over night) Drain through a fine sieve, season with more lemon juice (and sugar, if you wish).

Serve diluted with water (typically use 1 part cordial and 1-2 parts water, depending on your preference), adding ice cubes and garnishing with a lemon slice.

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/miscellaneous/fetch-recipe.php?rid=misc-meadowsweet-cordial
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