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 Dandelion

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Astraea

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PostSubject: Dandelion   Sun Mar 20, 2011 5:26 am

How to Make Dandelion Root Tincture
Using Fresh or Dried Roots of Dandelion

The dandelion root can be fresh or dried before making the tincture.

Dandelion has been used historically to detoxify the kidneys and liver, reduce swelling, fight skin problems, alleviate digestive discomfort, fight fever, improve vision problems, and prevent diabetes. Dandelion root is a natural diuretic that is naturally high in potassium. Potassium is often depleted from the body with pharmaceutical diuretics, but dandelion root replenishes the potassium lost from the body.
Making the Dandelion Root Tincture

The dandelion root can be fresh or dried before making the tincture. Fresh dandelion root tincture is made at 2 parts alcohol for each 1 part of dandelion root. Dried dandelion root tincture is made at 5 parts of alcohol for each one part of dried dandelion root.

Read more at Suite101: How to Make Dandelion Root Tincture: Using Fresh or Dried Roots of Dandelion http://www.suite101.com/content/how-to-make-dandelion-root-tincture-a121777#ixzz1H88Gtwqs

Fresh Dandelion

To make a tincture from fresh dandelion root:
1. Chop the dandelion root.
2. Weigh the dandelion root.
3. Place the dandelion root in a sterile Mason jar.
4. For each 1 part fresh dandelion root add 2 parts vodka to the Mason jar.
5. Cap the Mason jar tightly with a sterilized lid.
6. Shake the dandelion tincture well.
7. Label the tincture with the contents and the date of preparation.
8. Shake it once daily for 2 weeks.
9. Open the Mason jar after 2 weeks and strain the tincture through cheesecloth to remove any bits of dandelion root. Press the plant material against the cheesecloth to remove excess liquid.
10. Bottle and cap the liquid in a dark glass bottle with a dropper. Label with contents and date and store in a dark, cool area.

Dried Dandelion

To make a tincture from dried dandelion root:
1. Grind the dried dandelion root in a coffee grinder.
2. Weigh the dandelion root.
3. Place the dandelion root in a sterile Mason jar.
4. For each 1 part dried dandelion root add 3 parts vodka and 2 parts water to the Mason jar.
5. Cap the Mason jar tightly with a sterilized lid.
6. Shake the dandelion tincture well.
7. Label the tincture with the contents and the date of preparation.
8. Shake it once daily for 2 weeks.
9. Open the Mason jar after 2 weeks and strain the tincture through cheesecloth to remove any bits of dandelion root. Press the plant material against the cheesecloth to remove excess liquid.
10. Bottle and cap the liquid in a dark glass bottle with a dropper. Label with contents and date and store in a dark, cool area.

Dosage Information

For adult dosage use 8 – 15 ml of the dandelion root tincture three to four times each day. The tincture can be drunk by adding it to a glass of water. For children, use Clark’s Rule to determine the correct dose. Divide the weight of the child by 150. The result is the portion of the dose you would give the child. For example, a child weighing 50 pounds would get 1/3 (50/150) of an adult dose.




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Astraea

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Favorite Quote : Beware the deadly donkey falling from the sky You may choose the way you live, my friend But not the way you die
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PostSubject: Dandelion Magick   Sun Mar 20, 2011 5:32 am

Dandelion Magick
Wonder Plant of Mind, Body and Spirit
Quote :
The humble Dandelion has been celebrated for centuries as a powerful medicine and nutrition source. Learn here how to harvest and utilize one of Nature's finest plants.

MAGICAL PROPERTIES:

* Gender: Masculine
* Planet: Jupiter
* Element: Air
* Deity: Hecate, Brighid (Brigit, Brigid, Bride, etc),Belenos
* Power: Divination, Wishes, Messenger
* Astrological: Primary - Pisces, Sagittarius; Secondary - Aquarius, Sagittarius, Libra

Magical Benefits:

According to Scott Cunningham, author of over thirty books on herbs and Wicca, Dandelion is said to increase psychic abilities when taken as a tea. A tea of the roots left steaming and placed beside the bed will call spirits . Dandelion buried in the northwest corner of the house will bring favorable winds.

Other magical folklore surrounding the Dandelion includes blowing the seeds off a ripened head to carry your thoughts (or magical energies) to another; Love revelation (blowing all the seeds off with one blow indicates passionate love, seeds remaining indicates the love is fickle) and how many children you will have (the number of seeds left on the head after one blow).
History and Etymology

Dandelion comes from the French ‘Dens Leonis’ which eventually migrated into Middle English as ‘Dent De Lion’ or ‘Lions Tooth’. The name perhaps conferred from the observation of their mature leaves which are sharply indented and toothsome in appearance. This bright, yellow bloom often comes as one of the first indicators of spring, and is believed to have been brought over by the Europeans and cultivated originally for both its medicinal and nutritive properties, although some evidence exists that native cultures indigenous to the Americas prior to the arrival of the settlers.
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Notable herbalist Gregory Tilford has said, "Dandelion is one of the most complete plant foods on earth. All the vital nutrients are conveniently contained in a single source, in quantities that the body can easily process and fully absorb."
What makes it so nutritious?

Dandelions are packed with biologically active substances which help the body use them more effectively. Over sixty-four nutrients and health-promoting substances have been identified as present in Dandelions. They contain more beta-carotene than carrots, more potassium than bananas, more lecithin than soybeans, more iron than spinach, and loads of Vitamins A, C, E, thiamin and riboflavin, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. All these nutrients make Dandelions an effective liver tonic, blood purifier, anemia arrester, vision improver, reducer of cholesterol and blood pressure levels, and a host of other things.

Its scientific name, Taraxacum officinale, translated from Latin, means "official remedy for disorders."
Cultivation

Because the Dandelion is considered a common weed and generally hated by suburban America, be absolutely certain to pick only from places that have not been sprayed with pesticides or chemicals which will be absorbed by the plant rendering it toxic.

Leaves

The younger the plant is, whether head, leaves or root, the better it will taste. Dandelions are naturally on the bitter side (not unlike the taste of Endive) which makes them a superb choice for blending with other salad greens and topping with a wine vinaigrette dressing. They will be less bitter in early spring just before they flower, and in late fall when they have finished.
Roots

Late in the fall is the optimum time to harvest dandelion roots as this is the mature phase of the plant and when they will be at their biggest. Clean the roots well and let them dry for a few days. After most of the moisture has been allowed to evaporate and they have begun to shrink down in size, lightly roast them at about 200-250 degrees for 2-3 hours or until they are dry and brown, and smell like coffee. The roots can then be ground down to make a delicious coffee substitute, health tonic or used as a magical tincture.
Magical Uses

Brew equal amounts of coffee grounds and roasted Dandelion root. Steep for an hour and use before vision question, astral travel or meditation.

A final word about foraging for dandelions in general - they will absorb pesticides and pollutants if they are growing in contaminated areas. Stay well back from roadsides and other questionable areas.

Read more at Suite101: Dandelion Magick: Wonder Plant of Mind, Body and Spirit http://www.suite101.com/content/dandelion-magic-a24342#ixzz1H89Aw3kO
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Astraea

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Favorite Quote : Beware the deadly donkey falling from the sky You may choose the way you live, my friend But not the way you die
Registration date : 2007-08-11

PostSubject: The Healing Powers of Dandelion   Sun Mar 20, 2011 5:42 am

The Healing Powers of Dandelion
A Common Weed Used for a Variety of Medicinal Purposes

Aug 27, 2009 Deanna Lynn Sletten
Quote :
The dandelion has been used for centuries all over the world to heal a variety of ailments. Today, this little yellow weed is still considered a powerful medicine.
The dandelion may seem like a pesky weed to most people but for centuries it has been used for medicinal purposes by cultures all over the world. Every part of the dandelion, the flower, the leaves and the roots, are used for different medicinal purposes as well as for culinary use in salads, sandwiches or to make tea or wine. This versatile plant is full of surprises and healing abilities.
Dandelion's Nutrients and Available Forms

The dandelion grows in most places of the world including North America, Asia and Europe. The leaves are best when harvested in the spring before the plant flowers and the roots are best when harvested in the fall. In France and Germany the dandelion is cultivated primarily for its healing properties.

The dandelion contains a high source of vitamins A, B-Complex, C and D as well as the minerals potassium, zinc and iron. The flower of the dandelion contains more vitamin A than carrots. There are several uses for each part of the plant. While it is not dangerous to eat the plant outright, many parts of it are bitter to the taste. Dandelion can be found in several forms such as capsules, extract, or a herbal tea. Always read the dose instructions before taking any herbal supplement.

Medicinal Uses of Dandelion

Leaves – The leaves of the dandelion are a natural diuretic and are used in some parts of the world to treat high blood pressure. They are also used to aid in weight loss. The benefit of using dandelion over synthetic diuretics is that the leaves also contain high quantities of potassium, a mineral that becomes depleted when fluids leave the system. The leaves also promote a healthy gallbladder and are also known to help dissolve gallstones. Other uses of the dandelion leaves are as an antiviral agent, appetite stimulant, digestive aid, and to promote gastrointestinal health.

Flower– The dandelion flower is a good source of vitamin A and B-Complex and also contains the chemical compound helenin which is used to help cure night blindness. The flowers can be made into an herbal tea by steeping several in a pint of hot water. The flower also contains antioxidant properties and helps to improve the immune system. Homemade wine can also be made from the flowers and is beneficial to gallbladder health.

Root – The root of the dandelion is one of the most beneficial herbal remedies for the detoxification of the liver, gallbladder and kidneys. Because of its detoxification properties, many infections can be eliminated from the body. Recently, it has been found that the dandelion may also lower blood sugar levels and has been used in Europe for diabetes patients. The roots are also beneficial for treating arthritis, osteoarthritis and gout. Other conditions that can be treated by dandelion root are constipation, acne, eczema, and psoriasis. The dandelion root, in collaboration with the leaves, helps in dissolving and eliminating gallstones.

Side-Effects of Dandelion

Dandelion is one of the safest herbal remedies to take; it is always recommended to contact a doctor before using any herbal remedy. Some people may develop a skin rash from using dandelion due to an allergic reaction. Other side-effects include stomach ulcers, gastritis, water retention, digestive tract blockage, inflammation of the gallbladder, and blockage of the biliary tract. People who are already taking a diuretic or medicine to lower blood pressure should not use dandelion. Those on medication to lower blood sugar should also not take dandelion. Pregnant or breastfeeding women should not take any herbal remedy without consulting their physician.

Dandelion has many healing properties and is useful in many health situations as well as being part of a healthy diet. Whether using dandelion to treat a health concern or enjoying a cup of dandelion tea, the healing benefits of dandelion make this a powerful little weed.


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Astraea

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Age : 57
Location : Arizona, USA
Favorite Quote : Beware the deadly donkey falling from the sky You may choose the way you live, my friend But not the way you die
Registration date : 2007-08-11

PostSubject: Natural Healing Benefits of Dandelion   Sun Mar 20, 2011 5:47 am

While most of people keep a vigilant watch over their yards so the bright yellow dandelion flower doesn’t turn into fluffy seed helicopters that spread the dandelion population all over creation, health enthusiasts are actually cultivating the pretty weed in their gardens. Dandelion seeds can now be ordered from mail-order catalogs and it’s all part of the new healthier, green living.

The name of the plant comes from the French "dents de lion," meaning lion's teeth, which describes the jagged leaves. The plant is used by salad lovers and those interested in alternative medicine. Enthusiasts harvest them while the leaves are young and tender because they’re sweeter. The flowers are also edible and add a lot of color to a salad, while the roasted root is used for tea or a coffee substitute.

Natural Healing Herb

No one wants dandelions on a lawn, but consider the natural healing power of this herb. Dandelions are good for the liver and gallbladder because they helps with bile movement. Tea made from dandelion leaves encourages the elimination of toxins in the body.

Low in saturated fat, cholesterol and calories, a cup of dandelions has as much calcium as a cup of cottage cheese and is richer in vitamin A than carrots. A good source of folate, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, iron, potassium, manganese, and vitamins A, C, E, K and B1, 2 and 6, it’s also a good fiber source.

Natural Foods Co-Op Stores

With more people exploring new ideas in nutrition, dandelions are beginning to show up in natural foods co-op stores. Whether eaten fresh in a salad or cooked, they are becoming as popular as spinach and chard. There are several delicious recipes that use dandelions, including jelly and dandelion wine.

Here is a simple recipe for dandelion health tea: Mix two cups of dandelion leaves, one pint of pure water, a quarter cup orange juice, honey or stevia. Simmer leaves and water until it is liquefied, strain, add orange juice and sweeten to taste.
Dandelions: Healthy Herb for Children

For decades, adults have striven to rid the world of dandelions, but to children they’re beautiful flowers and they love to blow on the airy seed heads and watch them float away. Children love the simple dishes made from dandelions such as fried dandelion flowers or a peanut butter and dandelion jelly sandwich. As people learn more about the benefits of the nutrients found in this prolific little plant, the next generation of children will be healthier and happier.

Read more at Suite101: The Natural Healing Benefits of Dandelions http://www.suite101.com/content/the-natural-healing-of-dandelions-a254424#ixzz1H8DFbEaI
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Astraea

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Age : 57
Location : Arizona, USA
Favorite Quote : Beware the deadly donkey falling from the sky You may choose the way you live, my friend But not the way you die
Registration date : 2007-08-11

PostSubject: Dandelion Jelly   Sun Mar 20, 2011 5:53 am

Dandelion Jelly http://www.prairielandherbs.com/dandelionjelly.htm

Freshly Picked dandelion flowers
It took me about a 10 minutes to pick these!

You will need:

2 heaping cups of fresh dandelion petals (see note below - you'll need to gather about 4 cups whole flowers)
2 C boiling wter
1/4 C well-strained, clear lemon juice
4 C sugar
3 oz liquid pectin (Certo)
food coloring (optional)

NOTE: Look for fully opened flowers, the bigger the better, for ease of preparation. Of course do NOT use any dandelions that have been sprayed with fertilizers or pesticides!

cutting dandelion petals

And another 10-15 minutes to cut the petals off.


We'll want just the dandelion petals for this - not the whole flower head. You'll get SOME green sepals (wow, botany class was a long time ago - hope that is the correct term!), and that's fine - but try to minimize the amount of "green" and have mainly yellow petals for your infusion. It works best if you hold the flower by the end near the stem, and trim the petals into a bowl or cup, with sharp kitchen scisscors. All the dandelion blossoms stained my fingers yellow!

dandelion petals


Pour boiling water over petals and let steep from 30 minutes to 24
hours. I infused mine for about 2 hours - until the liquid was almost room temperature. Strain through a fine sieve, reserving the infusion. If not using immediately, refrigerate up to 24 hours.

Place jars and lids on rack in pan or stockpot deep enough to cover them with about two inches of water, bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer, keeping the jars hot until ready to fill.

dandelion blossom infusion


To make the jelly, stir lemon juice (I actually used lime, because that's what I had on hand, and it worked quite nicely!) and sugar into reserved infusion in a two-quart nonreactive or stainless steel pan. Bring to a full rolling boil that cannot be stirred down. Add the liquid pectin and continue to boil two minutes, skimming any foam that may rise to the surface.

As you can see - my infusion is NOT such a pretty color. I decided to add a bit of food coloring - about 20 drops of yellow. I've also seen people use green, but prefer the yellow. To me, Dandelion Jelly is honey-like, in flavor, so between that and the color of the blossoms, a yellow-colored jelly makes sense to me. Smile
jars of dandelion jelly

Ladle quickly into jars to within about 1/8 inch from the top; clean each rim and threads of the jar as it's filled, and place flat lid and ring on each before filling the next. Screw band on tightly and invert jar on tea towel for about five to 10 minutes. Jars should seal and lids should pop shut within 10 minutes as they cool. If they do not seal, you can place them in a hot water bath for 10 minutes or place in the refrigerator.
Sealed jars will last up to one year in a cool, dark place. Put any unsealed jelly in the refrigerator. it should keep about three weeks. Makes four or five half-pint jars.
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Astraea

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Number of posts : 2738
Age : 57
Location : Arizona, USA
Favorite Quote : Beware the deadly donkey falling from the sky You may choose the way you live, my friend But not the way you die
Registration date : 2007-08-11

PostSubject: Fried Dandelion Blossoms And Dandelion Wine   Sun Mar 20, 2011 5:54 am

Fried Dandelion Blossoms http://www.mountain-breeze.com/kitchen/dandelions/1.html

* new blossoms on short stems
* 1 c. milk
* 1/2 tsp. salt
* hot cooking oil
* 1 egg
* 1 c. flour
* pinch of pepper

1. Pick new dandelion blossoms, those on short stems, and rinse well in cool, lightly salted water.
2. Cut off the stem ends close to the flower heads, leaving only enough to hold the petals together, because the stems and greenery are bitter.
3. Roll the dandelion flowers in paper towels to blot up the excess moisture, then dip each one in a batter made of 1 egg, beaten, with 1 cup milk, 1 cup flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt and a pinch of pepper.
4. Drop the batter-coated blossoms into deep hot fat (375 degrees) and fry until lightly browned.
5. Drain on absorbent paper;
6. Sprinkle with more salt, if needed, and serve at once as a hot hors d'oeuvre.

Dandelion Wine http://www.mountain-breeze.com/kitchen/dandelions/7.html

* 1 qt. dandelion blossoms
* 1 gal. hot water
* 3 1/2 lb. sugar
* 2 lemons, cut up
* 2 oranges, cut up

1. Pour hot water over dandelion blossoms.
2. Let stand for 24 hours.
3. Strain in a jelly bag.
4. Heat juice again and add sugar, lemons and oranges.
5. Reheat, then put in a stone jar.
6. Let ferment.
7. Skim everyday for 6 or 7 weeks. Then bottle.
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